# shapes-and-letters

    Haris Butt

    Living a little @Slate

HT Standard

HT Standard is a set of 76 characters modelled in 3D. It is the right choice for creating type animations and all kinds of modifications. Drawn carefully with respect to an equal distribution of polygons it carries modern type design to the third dimension.

HT Standard is a set of 76 characters modelled in 3D. It is the right choice for creating type animations and all kinds of modifications. Drawn carefully with respect to an equal distribution of polygons it carries modern type design to the third dimension.

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Apocalypse

The design process started with the finding of a lettrage made for a book cover about the book of Revelations.

The design process started with the finding of a lettrage made for a book cover about the book of Revelations.

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Monument

Monument Grotesk owes its point de départ to a few contours Kasper-Florio stumbled upon online in 2013 in Palmer & Rey’s New Specimen Book, 1884, on page 81. It relied on a sturdy and compact skeleton, high vertical contrast and surprisingly sharp end strokes.

Monument Grotesk owes its point de départ to a few contours Kasper-Florio stumbled upon online in 2013 in Palmer & Rey’s New Specimen Book, 1884, on page 81. It relied on a sturdy and compact skeleton, high vertical contrast and surprisingly sharp end strokes.

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Teodor

Teodor is a serif typeface with a classicist appearance. His weight stress is vertical and contrast quite high. It’s x-height is standard and connection on stems smooth. It stands next to his brother Tobias and sister Reckless. As Teodor originates in classicism art period. It has calligraphic approach in the terminals.

Teodor is a serif typeface with a classicist appearance. His weight stress is vertical and contrast quite high. It’s x-height is standard and connection on stems smooth. It stands next to his brother Tobias and sister Reckless. As Teodor originates in classicism art period. It has calligraphic approach in the terminals.

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Signifier

Signifier is a Brutalist response to 17th century typefaces. Designed by Kris Sowersby, Signifier’s digital immateriality draws on a deeply material past. Acknowledging the processes and tools of digital form-making, Sowersby worked consciously with the computer to recast the lead, antimony, and tin of the 17th century Fell Types into ones and zeros. Signifier emerged from this alchemy with Bézier curves and sharp vectors determined by machine logic and a Brutalist ethos.

Signifier is a Brutalist response to 17th century typefaces. Designed by Kris Sowersby, Signifier’s digital immateriality draws on a deeply material past. Acknowledging the processes and tools of digital form-making, Sowersby worked consciously with the computer to recast the lead, antimony, and tin of the 17th century Fell Types into ones and zeros. Signifier emerged from this alchemy with Bézier curves and sharp vectors determined by machine logic and a Brutalist ethos.

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Bluu Next Bold

Bluu Next Bold is sharp and precise, a totally good choice to replace any boring serif font like the Times. Bluu Next was created by Jean-Baptiste Morizot and is currently distributed by Velvetyne. It was initially submitted to us by Open Foundry. Bold is a Serif cut of the Bluu Next family, which only consists of a single style. It is licensed under the SIL Open Font License 1.1 and available for contribution, modification or download on its open-source page.

Bluu Next Bold is sharp and precise, a totally good choice to replace any boring serif font like the Times. Bluu Next was created by Jean-Baptiste Morizot and is currently distributed by Velvetyne. It was initially submitted to us by Open Foundry. Bold is a Serif cut of the Bluu Next family, which only consists of a single style. It is licensed under the SIL Open Font License 1.1 and available for contribution, modification or download on its open-source page.

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Junicode

Junicode (short for Junius-Unicode) is a TrueType/OpenType font for medievalists with extensive coverage of the Latin Unicode ranges, plus Runic and Gothic. The font comes in four faces. Of these, regular and italic are fullest, featuring complete implementation of the Medieval Unicode Font Initiative recommendation, version 4.0. The bold and bold italic faces are less full.

Junicode (short for Junius-Unicode) is a TrueType/OpenType font for medievalists with extensive coverage of the Latin Unicode ranges, plus Runic and Gothic. The font comes in four faces. Of these, regular and italic are fullest, featuring complete implementation of the Medieval Unicode Font Initiative recommendation, version 4.0. The bold and bold italic faces are less full.

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Inter

Inter is a typeface carefully crafted & designed for computer screens.

Inter is a typeface carefully crafted & designed for computer screens.

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IBM Plex

The IBM Plex typeface is an open-source project and available for download and use following the Open Font License (OFL). The IBM Plex family comes in Sans, Serif, Mono and Sans Condensed, all with roman and true italics. The fonts have been designed to work well in user interface (UI) environments, as well as other mediums. This project provides all source files and file formats to support most typographical situations.

The IBM Plex typeface is an open-source project and available for download and use following the Open Font License (OFL). The IBM Plex family comes in Sans, Serif, Mono and Sans Condensed, all with roman and true italics. The fonts have been designed to work well in user interface (UI) environments, as well as other mediums. This project provides all source files and file formats to support most typographical situations.

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Roboto

Google’s signature family of fonts, the default font on Android and Chrome OS, and the recommended font for Google’s visual language, Material Design.

Google’s signature family of fonts, the default font on Android and Chrome OS, and the recommended font for Google’s visual language, Material Design.

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SF Pro

This sans-serif typeface is the system font for iOS, macOS, and tvOS, and includes a rounded variant. It provides a consistent, legible, and friendly typographic voice.

This sans-serif typeface is the system font for iOS, macOS, and tvOS, and includes a rounded variant. It provides a consistent, legible, and friendly typographic voice.

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Futura Passata

An experimental display face combining two widths into one font. Deceptively simple, Futura Passata has been described as more of a “design tool” than a typeface. Alternating widths of each capital letter are combined to create an irregular horizontal rhythm.

An experimental display face combining two widths into one font. Deceptively simple, Futura Passata has been described as more of a “design tool” than a typeface. Alternating widths of each capital letter are combined to create an irregular horizontal rhythm.

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AUTHENTIC Untitled

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Athletics

Athletics is a monolinear sans serif that aims to push the limits. Extended strokes, asymmetric arcs, and a low aperture come together in a characterful yet functional typeface.

Athletics is a monolinear sans serif that aims to push the limits. Extended strokes, asymmetric arcs, and a low aperture come together in a characterful yet functional typeface.

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Akzidenz-Grotesk

Berthold first published Akzidenz-Grotesk in 1898. Originally named “Accidenz-Grotesk” the design originates from Royal Grotesk light by royal type-cutter Ferdinand Theinhardt. The Theinhardt foundry later merged with Berthold and also supplied the regular, medium and bold weights. In the 1950s Günter Gerhard Lange, then art director at Berthold, began a project to enlarge the typeface family, adding a larger character set, but retaining all of the idiosyncrasies of the 1898 face. Under the direction of Günter Gerhard Lange, Berthold added AG Medium Italic (1963), AG ExtraBold (1966) , AG Italic (1967), AG ExtraBold Condensed & Italic (1968), AG Super (1968).

Berthold first published Akzidenz-Grotesk in 1898. Originally named “Accidenz-Grotesk” the design originates from Royal Grotesk light by royal type-cutter Ferdinand Theinhardt. The Theinhardt foundry later merged with Berthold and also supplied the regular, medium and bold weights. In the 1950s Günter Gerhard Lange, then art director at Berthold, began a project to enlarge the typeface family, adding a larger character set, but retaining all of the idiosyncrasies of the 1898 face. Under the direction of Günter Gerhard Lange, Berthold added AG Medium Italic (1963), AG ExtraBold (1966) , AG Italic (1967), AG ExtraBold Condensed & Italic (1968), AG Super (1968).

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undefined medium

undefined medium is a free and open-source pixel grid-based monospace typeface suitable for programming, writing, and whatever else you can think of … it’s pretty undefined.

undefined medium is a free and open-source pixel grid-based monospace typeface suitable for programming, writing, and whatever else you can think of … it’s pretty undefined.

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Full Auto Foundry

In some way, at the beginning of the year I began thinking about both automation and type design. With type design it was Less about the final form of typeface making and more about the process of the practise instead. In terms of automation I was thinking about how easy it was to text. You can mash a keyboard or a touchpad and if by some sort of magic a string of words will most likely emerge. Although it might not make any sense. Because of 'autocorrect, the gap between whim and ideas and word is narrower than it's ever been, and our world is filled with easily rendered thought.' My question to myself was, could I design like this in someway? More specifically, could I design typefaces like this? And what would the visual result of auto-completing typefaces be? Any idea I have easily rendered real? Or, any lack of idea easily rendered real. Designing without thinking too much about it. Thinking and doing, doing and thinking. Or not thinking just doing and still, in the end, you have something real.

In some way, at the beginning of the year I began thinking about both automation and type design. With type design it was Less about the final form of typeface making and more about the process of the practise instead. In terms of automation I was thinking about how easy it was to text. You can mash a keyboard or a touchpad and if by some sort of magic a string of words will most likely emerge. Although it might not make any sense. Because of 'autocorrect, the gap between whim and ideas and word is narrower than it's ever been, and our world is filled with easily rendered thought.' My question to myself was, could I design like this in someway? More specifically, could I design typefaces like this? And what would the visual result of auto-completing typefaces be? Any idea I have easily rendered real? Or, any lack of idea easily rendered real. Designing without thinking too much about it. Thinking and doing, doing and thinking. Or not thinking just doing and still, in the end, you have something real.

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Ferrite Core DX

Ferrite Core DX font family by Froyo Tam, Licensed under SIL Open Font License v1.1

Ferrite Core DX font family by Froyo Tam, Licensed under SIL Open Font License v1.1

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Routed Gothic

A clean implementation of a common lettering style found on technical drawings, engraved office signs, computer and typewriter keyboards, and some comic books and avionics from the mid-20th century. It’s ugly, and therein lies its beauty. I created this font by purchasing a Leroy Lettering set, using Inkscape to trace the scanned letterforms of one of its templates, and some FontForge Python scripting. Other keywords I want people to use to find this font include: Wrico.

A clean implementation of a common lettering style found on technical drawings, engraved office signs, computer and typewriter keyboards, and some comic books and avionics from the mid-20th century. It’s ugly, and therein lies its beauty. I created this font by purchasing a Leroy Lettering set, using Inkscape to trace the scanned letterforms of one of its templates, and some FontForge Python scripting. Other keywords I want people to use to find this font include: Wrico.

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Garamon(d/t)

Here we are! The last missing link of the great Garamond family has been found! Expert Paul Tubert brought it to us. It’s a hardcore revival of a revival: the Garamond typeface, published in 1926 by the French Deberny et Peignot type foundry. Itself based on the initial work of sixteenth century French type designer Claude Garamont ! Are you still with us? Anyway, Paul scanned it, smashed it up and made these delightful regular and italic versions. So Stop bothering about the spelling no more, use Garamon(d/t) !

Here we are! The last missing link of the great Garamond family has been found! Expert Paul Tubert brought it to us. It’s a hardcore revival of a revival: the Garamond typeface, published in 1926 by the French Deberny et Peignot type foundry. Itself based on the initial work of sixteenth century French type designer Claude Garamont ! Are you still with us? Anyway, Paul scanned it, smashed it up and made these delightful regular and italic versions. So Stop bothering about the spelling no more, use Garamon(d/t) !

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fonderie.download

fonderie.download is your new favorite website. We design and distribute typefaces. All our fonts are released under the WTFPL license : it means that you can literally do what the fuck you want to with them. We are not kind enough to be on social media but you can drop us an email here. We would be happy to see what you do with (y)our fonts.

fonderie.download is your new favorite website. We design and distribute typefaces. All our fonts are released under the WTFPL license : it means that you can literally do what the fuck you want to with them. We are not kind enough to be on social media but you can drop us an email here. We would be happy to see what you do with (y)our fonts.

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Raptor V3 font family | Superior Type

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